Jacques Jarrige – Meanders


Opening May 15th - July 15th, 2012


Valerie Goodman Gallery will present the stirring poetic sculptural furniture of Jacques Jarrige with a multi-media opening reception at Valerie Goodman Gallery on May15, 2012 at 315 E 91 Street. After successful shows in Paris and New York in 2010, Jacques Jarrige promises to enchant New York audiences with never seen before functional art creations that evoke both the uneven meanderings of nature and the convenience (sophistication?) of urban modernity.

Jarrige’s roots are in Classicism, Modernism and Art Brut but the underlying element in his creations is its effortlessness, the way they connect man and nature and their utter simplicity and balance which restores the spirit. The energy which flows through Jarrige’s work recalls the poetic mobility of Matisse’s Dancers and Calder’s mobile sculptures.

The exhibition which runs from May 15, 2012 until July 15, 2012 will unveil Jacques Jarrige’s  new work: sculpted cabinets, room dividers, desks and lighting fixtures. A particularly outstanding piece is a large, dramatic screen evoking dances from antiquity and projecting dramatic light and shadow onto the room.

In addition to his individual artistic pursuit Jacques Jarrige  also dedicates time to a Parisian psychiatric hospital workshop and an impressive mobile sculpture created by Jarrige and the patients will be on view to demonstrate the synergy of the collaboration.

Jarrige’s work has been collected and exhibited internationally. Pieces in private collections can be seen in recent publications of World of Interiors , Architectural Digest and Maison Francaise among others . His work is in the permanent collection of the Mobilier National (France) and has been exhibited at  prestigious venues including  Galerie En Attendant les Barbares, Paris, Hotel de Ville de Paris and L’Ecole Francaise VIA .

Following Jarrige’s premiere U.S. exhibition at Valerie Goodman Gallery in 2010 top architects including  Ike Kligerman & Barkley, Michael Smith and Matthew Smyth sought his work for use in private residences and show houses.